Steady Flow Past a Cylinder Using Ansys Workbench

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Chimneys are tall cylindrical structures used for venting exhaust gases into the atmosphere. With their increased usage in industries, it is important to study the aerodynamic effects of wind on these chimneys. As wind speed increases, the pressure forces experienced at different locations of these structures also increase. It becomes critical to understand and study the distribution of these aerodynamic forces in the stability of the structures, which can be estimated with the help of engineering simulations. In this course, we consider a canonical problem of steady flow past a cylinder to understand the aerodynamic effect of wind on chimneys.

This SimCafe Course was developed by Dr. Rajesh Bhaskaran, Swanson Director of Engineering Simulation at Cornell University, and John Matthew Singleton Jr in partnership with Ansys. It serves as an e-learning resource to integrate industry-standard simulation tools into courses and provides a resource for supplementary learning outside the classroom. In this course, we learn to model the convective heat transfer through an electronics box by following the end-to-end workflow in Ansys Workbench.

For more ways to learn, check out the Cornell edX course, A Hands-on Introduction to Engineering Simulations at ansys.com/cornell.

Cornell University also offers a Fluid Dynamics Simulations Using Ansys online certificate authored by Dr. Rajesh Bhaskaran. Learn more here: https://ecornell.cornell.edu/fluiddynamics

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Most fluid flows (gas or liquid) are turbulent in nature. These flows are characterized by unsteady and irregular fluctuations of transport quantities such as mass, momentum and species in both space and time. These fluctuations enhance flow mixing. In this SimCafe course, you will learn how to model three dimensional internal turbulent pipe flow. You will create the geometry, the computational mesh and set up the boundary conditions needed for the simulation. The fundamental concepts and the steps needed to successfully model this fluid flow problem are explained using step-by-step instructions.

Wind turbines are used to capture the kinetic energy of the wind and convert it into electrical energy. Depending on the orientation of the rotor shaft, wind turbines are typically categorized as (1) vertical axis wind turbine (VAWT), and (2) horizontal axis wind turbines (HAWT). To increase the efficiency of these turbines, a design engineer must consider the aerodynamic forces on blades and the flow behavior around these blades. Engineering simulations are commonly used to estimate these aerodynamic forces. In this course, we will use the Multiple Reference Frame (MRF) approach to model the Vertical axis wind turbine using Ansys Fluent and study the flow behavior around its blades.

To increase the efficiency of wind turbines, a design engineer must consider the flow behavior around these blades and estimate the aerodynamic forces developed by the flowing wind. Engineering simulations are commonly used to estimate these aerodynamic forces. At low wind speeds, the flow around turbine blades is typically steady. But as the wind speed increases, the flow behavior around blades becomes transient. This creates vortices in the flow. In this SimCafe Course, we will use the transient sliding mesh approach to model the vertical axis wind turbine using Ansys Fluent and study the unsteady flow behavior around its blades.